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Bidding Information
Lot #    12421
Auction End Date    12/20/2005 10:37:00 AM (mm/dd/yyyy)
          
Title Information
Title (English)    Der Judische Volkssozialiamus
Author    [Zionism - First Ed.] Victor (Chaim) Arlosoroff
City    Berlin
Publisher    Hapoel Hazir
Publication Date    1919
          
Collection Information
Independent Item    This listing is an independent item not part of any collection
          
Description Information
Physical
Description
   First edition. 72 pp., 226:155 mm., wide margins, light age staining. A very good copy bound in the original title wrappers.
          
Detailed
Description
   Victor (Chaim) Arlosoroff (18991933), Zionist statesman and leader of the Zionist labor movement. Arlosoroff was born in Romny, Ukraine, the grandson of a famous rabbi. He was taken to Germany by his parents in 1905 in the wake of a pogrom. In 1918 Arlosoroff joined the Zionist labor party Hitahadut (Ha-Po'el ha-Za'ir) and soon became one of its leaders. A pamphlet he wrote in 1919, "Jewish Popular Socialism," attempted to combine non-Marxist socialism with a practical approach to the problems of Jewish settlement in Palestine. He soon attracted attention by advocating new methods of financing Zionist settlement, especially through an international loan guaranteed by the League of Nations and the Mandatory power. He also expressed the belief that cooperation between the Arab and Jewish national movements was possible.

Arlosoroff settled in Palestine in 1924, after finishing his studies in economics at Berlin University. In 1926 he became a member of the yishuv delegation to the League of Nations Permanent Mandates Commission. In that year, and again in 192829, he visited the United States, publishing his impressions in a series of letters, New York vi-Yrushalayim (1929), which contain sociological and economic studies of American Jewry. With the founding of Mapai in 1930, Arlosoroff became one of the party's leaders and spokesmen. A staunch supporter of Chaim Weizmann's policies, Arlosoroff was elected a member of the Zionist and Jewish Agency Executive and head of its Political Department at the 17th Zionist Congress in 1931. Despite the friendly personal and political relations he established with the British High Commissioner in Palestine, Sir Arthur Wauchope, Arlosoroff began to doubt the durability of Britain's commitment to Zionism in view of its involvement in the Middle East. This was a reversal of his earlier conviction that the Zionist ideal could be fully implemented in cooperation with Britain. He also came to doubt the feasibility of a Jewish-Arab understanding in the foreseeable future. In a confidential letter to Weizmann, written in June 1932 (published in 1949), Arlosoroff discussed the possibility of an interim "revolutionary" period, in which a Jewish minority develop the country and save as many Jews as possible, as the approaching world war and emerging Arab nationalism might otherwise prevent the ultimate realization of Zionism. In 1933 Arlosoroff dedicated himself to organizing massive emigration of Jews from Nazi Germany and the transfer of their property to Palestine. In June 1933 he was assassinated by unknown assailants while walking with his wife on the seashore of Tel Aviv.

Arlosoroff was a man of vision and action, a shrewd observer of sociological and economic processes, and a poet. A prolific writer, his works included political and economic analyses, a world history of colonization, research works, and poetry. His writings, Kitvei Chaim Arlosoroff, were published in seven volumes (193435), the last one containing his poetry. His highly informative diaries from the years 193133, Yoman Yerushalayim, were published in 1949 (ed. by Z. Sharef). In his Selected Articles (in Hebrew: Mivhar Maamarav, 1944) there is a list of his works and writings about him. Kiryat Hayyim near Haifa, Kibbutz Givat Hayyim, and the village Kefar Hayyim in Emek Hefer, as well as streets in many towns, are named after him.

          
Reference
Description
   EJ
        
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Listing Classification
Period
20th Century:    Checked
  
Location
Germany:    Checked
  
Subject
Other:    Zionism
  
Characteristic
First Editions:    Checked
Language:    German
  
Manuscript Type
  
Kind of Judaica