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Bidding Information
Lot #    20397
Auction End Date    4/1/2008 12:12:00 PM (mm/dd/yyyy)
          
Title Information
Title (English)    Dos gezang fun Neger folk
Title (Hebrew)    דאז געזאנג פון נעגער פאלק: איבערדיכטונגען
Author    [Only Ed.] Zishe Bagish, Trans.
City    Chicago
Publisher    M. Ceshinsky
Publication Date    1936
          
Collection Information
Independent Item    This listing is an independent item not part of any collection
          
Description Information
Physical
Description
   Only edition. 44, [4] pp., 176:134 mm., nice margins, light age staining. A very good copy bound in the original tiutle paper wrappers. Limited edition - Copy number 16 of 500. (Aroysgegebn in 500 ekz.)
          
Detailed
Description
   This volume has an illustrated cover and is autographed by the author. It includes poetry by Langston Hughes, the famous Black poet, translated into Yiddish. The cover was designed by Y. Tinovitski. The author also wrote Khinezish, Lernt lib tsu hobn s´lebn, dish Belgia, et al.

James Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri. His parents divorced when he was a small child. He was raised by his grandmother until he was thirteen, when he moved to Lincoln, Illinois, to live with his mother and her husband, eventually settling in Cleveland, Ohio. It was in Lincoln, Illinois, that Hughes began writing poetry. Following graduation, he spent a year in Mexico and a year at Columbia University. During these years, he held odd jobs as an assistant cook, launderer, and a busboy, and travelled to Africa and Europe working as a seaman. In November 1924, he moved to Washington, D.C. Hughes first book of poetry, The Weary Blues, was published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1926. He finished his college education at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania three years later. In 1930 his first novel, Not Without Laughter, won the Harmon gold medal for literature.

Hughes, who claimed Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Carl Sandburg, and Walt Whitman as his primary influences, is particularly known for his insightful, colorful portrayals of black life in America from the twenties through the sixties. He wrote novels, short stories and plays, as well as poetry, and is also known for his engagement with the world of jazz and the influence it had on his writing, as in Montage of a Dream Deferred. His life and work were enormously important in shaping the artistic contributions of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Unlike other notable black poets of the period--Claude McKay, Jean Toomer, and Countee Cullen--Hughes refused to differentiate between his personal experience and the common experience of black America. He wanted to tell the stories of his people in ways that reflected their actual culture, including both their suffering and their love of music, laughter, and language itself.

Langston Hughes died of complications from prostate cancer in May 22, 1967, in New York. In his memory, his residence at 20 East 127th Street in Harlem, New York City, has been given landmark status by the New York City Preservation Commission, and East 127th Street was renamed "Langston Hughes Place."

          
Reference
Description
   http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/83
        
Associated Images
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Listing Classification
Period
20th Century:    Checked
  
Location
America-South America:    Checked
  
Subject
Other:    Poetry
  
Characteristic
First Editions:    Checked
Language:    Yiddish
  
Manuscript Type
  
Kind of Judaica